Parlour act:

 

In this 30-40 minute act Jack will perform feats of magic that defy logic, sometimes under the guise of scientific exhibitions, presenting thought-provoking aspects of science that the “thinking people” can relate to. A show that infuses the elements of the periodic table with the elements of a full night out: enjoyment, laughs, engagement, and a lot to think about! Or perhaps leave you clueless… Too often a magic performance leaves  the spectators with obvious answers: ‘it went up the magician’s baggy sleeves’, ‘there is a secret compartment in the magic box’, 'he switched it while I wasn't looking', etc. Jack's job is to eliminate each one of these solutions. Side effects may include audible gasps, rejection of the predictable, and a sudden urge to re-evaluate your beliefs.

Are you organizing a science fair, workshop or conference and looking for a special treat for all attendees? A successful event distributes knowledge while being motivational, fun, and thought-provoking. Often referred to as the "science magician", with  a PhD in the life sciences from University College London and over a decade of experience as a magician, Jack knows how to make magic interesting, and entertain the “thinking people”.

SCIENCE MEETS MAGIC

Performing for Nobel prize winner Sir Paul Nurse.

 

"ANY SUFFICIENTLY ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY IS

INDISTINGUISHABLE

FROM MAGIC."

 

ARTHUR C. CLARKE

 

 

Walk around/table magic:

 


This is the type of magic where Jack move around the room astounding guests in small groups. Here, he will combine highly visual illusions with science education and comedy. For the sceptical members of the crowd who might question his supernatural abilities to break the laws of physics, everything he uses will either be borrowed or examined. Jack will have nothing up my sleeves! In fact, he rolls them up... it's magic under test conditions!

"Reading minds" through a glass of water.

"In the 20 years I have been organising these events, this is the first time I have seen a standing ovation!"

Carolyn Dale

Imperial College, Physics Department

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